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Circuit Bending, Hardware Hacking and Performance Technology

MOD003618

http://rhoadley.net/cbhh - VLE - facebook

Reading List 2015-16


Timetable 2014-15, semester 2
Seminar Tuesday 0900-1100 Hel040
Lab Thursday 0900-1100 Com101
Richard Hoadley's feedback hours
(teaching weeks only)
Monday 1400-1500
Friday 1300-1500
Hel244

to top of pagetasks123456789101112

 

to top of page  Learning Outcomes

  1. - understand the inter-relationships between musical creation and performance, especially noting aesthetic and philosophical issues concerning interface/instrument design.
  2. - analyse a variety of techniques, including software manipulation and hardware design and modification for tasks such as sonic manipulation, composition and performance.
  3. - utilise skills in public presentation, including an awareness of audience characteristics and responses.
  4. - negotiate and acquire performance/demonstration opportunities, considering the use of sound, light, movement and image as parts of performance



 

to top of page  Summary

This module is principally based around investigation and manipulation of the electronics used for hardware hacking, circuit bending and 'modding', and so will include a variety of methods for controlling pre-existing hardware, such as electronic toys and simple battery-powered audio devices. The aims of this experience will include the development of sonic assets which may be used in the creation of audio art. Students will gain experience through a series of tasks and projects culminating in a final submission, which includes a performance or exhibition. Students will submit their collected exercises in a portfolio, accompanied by audio-visual documentation as necessary and a brief critical evaluation. This critical evaluation should place the student's work in the context of current trends in performance technology as well as providing a basis for the students' own criteria and judgement. A materials charge may apply for this module. Alternatively, students may be asked to purchase a certain collection of materials to work with during the course.




 

to top of page  Content

  1. -Investigate the components and circuitry of basic devices that use electronic audio.
  2. -Manipulate these components to create original musical ideas.
  3. -Investigate the effect of the user interface on musical performance.
  4. -Review, test and use a variety of hardware resources.
  5. -Review and visit other artists' work, including colleagues.
  6. -Guided workshops introducing techniques for hardware manipulation and the human user interface.






to top of page Presentations

You should investigate other recent developments in interface design. New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) is one of the most interesting sources for this. Look at the internet site, noting that the proceedings of the last three or four years' conferences are on-line. Look through these papers (there are many of them) and choose one that appeals to you. Prepare a short presentation on why the approach you've chosen appeals to you. Although you don't have to prepare a formal presentation, making sure you can display the paper (via the data projector provided) in addition to any images, videos or recordings normally makes things much more interesting. Try to have a look at what others are going to talk about if you can. NIME is a good place to look, but you don't have to use one of those papers. However, if you don't please clear the paper/subject you choose with your tutor to begin with.

The presentation itself will not receive a mark, but you will receive a 5% penalty from the entire module should you not present, (so, if you end up with 58%, you will actually get 53%). While you do not need to write an essay, you should submit the information you have included in your presentations in the logbook, including links to documents, images, videos and web pages as well as a summary of your arguments and conclusions.

Presentation Chooser (Single, v005a)

sidshort nameemail time and date
w6
Will Heasman
Dan Lawton
Macca Leeks
Will Linsley
Jonathan Mills
Jimmy Ostler

w7
Frazer Robinson
Shaun Dos Santos
Ashley Sargeant
Danny Schmitz
Tom Watts
Please read the detailed submission notes

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

to top of page Performances

Blurb

Presentation Chooser (Single, v005a)

sidshort nameemail time and date
w11
TBA

w12
TBA
Please read the detailed submission notes






 
 
 

to top of pageTask, Project and Assessment Summary

The Logbook

All work on tasks and presentations as well as documentation of your projects should be collected together into a Logbook. You can optionall include a physical copy of the logbook, but an electronic verision must be submitted.

The logbook is worth 50% of your total mark.

The logbook should include:

The logbook can be compiled using any word processing software, including Google Docs. When complete, save to pdf. Refer to submitted movies from within the logbook, but include the movies separately in the submission. Images can, of course, be included in the logbook.

Deductions

The 50% weighting for the Individual Project includes the following potential deductions:

Participation

Please plan to attend all classes and arrive on time. Please be courteous to the collegial community we are creating this semester by not conversing with others during class lectures; be mindful during the labs that this is time is designed to give you guided practice with some of the tools you will need in order to complete your assignments.

Participation means being an active member of the dialogue. It consists of doing one or more of the following: being prepared for class and writing comments in your logbooks and in the Facebook group, by making observations about the readings and exercises, by asking questions, by staying on topic. In classs, taking notes, actively working on in-class exercises instead of unrelated activities like email, chat and general web surfing, and actively listening lends to better discussion.

Unexpected problems happen (serious illness, etc.), it is important to let me know so we can make appropriate changes to your schedule. If you will miss class for whatever reason, let me know as soon as possible so we can make alternative arrangements for this as well.

 
  Task Set Value (%)
1 Cable : Make your own cable w2 logbook (50%)
2 Laying on of Hands and Hacking the Clock : Initial investigations of your toy... w2 logbook (50%)
3 Amplifier : Amplify your toy w3 logbook (50%)
4 Synthesis on a chip : Synthesise sounds on a simple chip w3 logbook (50%)
5 Sudomini : Make a Sudomini w4 logbook (50%)
6 Make a mike : Make your own electret microphone w4 logbook (50%)
7 Capacitative Touch Sensor : Make your own capacitative touch sensor w5 logbook (50%)
8 Boxing : Boxing and Rebuilding w5 logbook
Individual Circuit Bending Project Individual Circuit Bending Project - Choose some aspect covered during the course to concentrate on and complete a creative project for performance towards the end of the course.
The 25% weighting for the Individual Circuit Bending Project includes the following potential deductions:

  • 10% for non-performance without good reason (so, should your submission receive 60% you will receive a mark of 50%.
  • 10% for non-submission of a recorded version of your performance
  • 10% for submission of poorly presented documentation.
  • Failure to submit either of the above will result in failure of the module
  • See above for deductions for submission of too much data.
w8 25%
'NIME' Presentation You should investigate other recent developments in interface design. New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) is one of the most interesting sources for this. Look at the internet site, noting that the proceedings of the last three or four years' conferences are on-line. Look through these papers (there are many of them) and choose one that appeals to you. Prepare a short presentation on why the approach you've chosen appeals to you. Although you don't have to prepare a formal presentation, making sure you can display the paper (via the data projector provided) in addition to any images, videos or recordings normally makes things much more interesting. Try to have a look at what others are going to talk about if you can. NIME is a good place to look, but you don't have to use one of those papers. However, if you don't please clear the paper/subject you choose with your tutor to begin with.

The presentation itself will not receive a mark, but you will receive a 5% penalty from the entire module should you not present, (so, if you end up with 58%, you will actually get 53%). While you do not need to write an essay, you should submit the information you have included in your presentations in the logbook, including links to documents, images, videos and web pages as well as a summary of your arguments and conclusions.

Presentation Chooser (Single, v005a)

w1 logbook (50%)
9 "Hello world!" w7 logbook (50%)
10 Vibrating a piezo w8 logbook (50%)
11 Connecting the Arduino, MaxMSP and SuperCollider w9 logbook (50%)
12 Mapping w9 logbook (50%)
Individual Arduino Project Individual Arduino Project - Choose some aspect covered during the course to concentrate on and complete a creative project for performance towards the end of the course.
The 25% weighting for the Individual Arduino Project includes the following potential deductions:

  • 10% for non-performance without good reason (so, should your submission receive 60% you will receive a mark of 50%.
  • 10% for non-submission of a recorded version of your performance
  • 10% for submission of poorly presented documentation.
  • Failure to submit either of the above will result in failure of the module
  • See above for deductions for submission of too much data.
w8 25%

All assignments should be submitted to the i-centre by 2pm on Monday 8th May 2017


 

to top of page  Course Outline

to top of page   General Outline

to top of pagetasks123456789101112
Week Focus Project/Task
1
Class structure and locations
Laboratories (Com 101): demonstrations (~1hr) and practicals (~1hr)
Lectures (Hel040)

- If you don't have the parts, you can't do the practical
- Bring along cameras, etc., and you'll be able to complete 
many of the tasks straightaway.
- Practicals are not 'compulsory', but you're recommended to 
make use of them in one way or another, maybe to get more 
components?
- Website, VLE and Facebook group.
- Tom Igoe's Physical Computing Course - an excellent resource
- Makespace
- Dorkbot Anglia
- Sonic Pi


Hel040 Seminar - Who am I? - What is research? - When am I available? - Previous examples - Disruptive technology and disruptive innovation - Electrical Derby - Basic Electronics 1: resistance - Simulations http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/resistance-in-a-wire - Circuit Construction: http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/circuit-construction-kit-dc - http://fritzing.org/ - MacSpice - NIME papers. Organise presentations. Claim via Facebook. - Circuit Bending Videos notes
Bry015 Laboratory - Access to Com 101 - Practice, practice, practice - The Materials list and local and online Suppliers - How to Solder - http://www.ladyada.net/learn/soldering/thm.html - Complex soldering - Batteries, wall-warts, power supplies Task 1: Cable: Make your own cable (part of the logbook) Task 2: Laying on of Hands and Hacking the Clock (part of the logbook) For next lab - bring components to make an audio cable of your choice (see task 1) - bring in some electronic toys, gadgets, pens or cards which record, basically anything that is battery powered (or that doesn't plug into the mains), a speaker (mains powered is better for this) and a cable that plugs into the speaker. Practical Soldering practice (maybe clip leads), or you can go and get components for next week.
Reading and listening, follow-up work - experiment with changing batteries and attaching toys to power supplies (long but appropriate power supply tutorial here) - The Seven Basic Rules of Hacking - Sniffing Glue and Hacking - Collins, N., (2009) Handmade Electronic Music, New York: Routledge - Ghazala, R.,(2005) Circuit Bending, Indianapolis: Wiley Publishing - Alvin Lucier, David Tudor, Matt Rogalsky, Pauline Oliveros, homepage Gavin Briars, Made in Hong Kong: http://thecollection.soundandmusic.org/sites/default/files/migrated/scores//3097w.pdf
Task 1
 - Cable

task 1 due: w13
task 1 weighting: logbook (50%)
task summary |  VLE
2
040 Lecture
- Presentations (NIME, youtube, etc.)
- Basic Electronics 2: capacitance (MYO) - 
-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYH9dGl4gUE
(also see other Make tutorials)
- Simulations (reminder)
- Some listening
- Ubuweb

Resistance
- Resistance simulation
- Resistor chart
- Make resistance video introduction
- Potentiometers
- (Multimeter)
- batteries: rechargeable or not?  Which sort?

- Royal Institution Christmas Lectures 2014:
Lecture 1: The Light Bulb Moment
Lecture 2: Making Contact
Lecture 3: A New Revolution

For next seminar
Think about the following questions:
- Why has the maker movement become so popular over the last ten years?
- Provide an overview of prominent microprocessors and microcontrollers, 
outlining their advantages and disadvantages.



BRY015 Lab Demonstration: Cable - Clip leads - how useful are they (but no substitute for soldering)! - Make a cable with the things you've brought along. - If you haven't got the stuff, go and get it. BRY015 Lab Demonstration: Circuit Bending demo 1 (Laying on of hands) - Circuit bending - Taking apart the toy. - Circuit sniffing - The laying on of hands - Tickling clocks - Hacking clocks - NB Keep documentation, particularly photographs and video. Resistance - Resistance simulation - Resistor chart - Make resistance video introduction - Potentiometers - (Multimeter) For next lab - For next lab, bring in components for the amplification and synth on a chip tasks.
Reading and Listening - Nicholas Collins, 1999, Pea Soup, (Apestaartje) - Ghazala, R., 2005, Circuit Bending, (Indianapolis: ): Part 1. - (Self-)selected papers from NIME 2005 Proceedings Investigating - Reed Ghazala's Website
Task 1
 - Cable
task 1 due: w13
task 1 weighting: logbook (50%)
Task 2
 - Laying on of Hands and Hacking the Clock

task 2 due: w13
task 2 weighting: logbook (50%)
task summary |  VLE
3
040 Lecture
NB 2015-16 this session in COM101

All You Need is Lab documentary (Box of Broadcasts)
The Challenges of Technological Performance
RH presentation of his past and current work
Handmade Electronic Music and other course texts review
Performance Technologies past and present:
Hugh Davies
Ryan Jordan: Derelict Electronics
Derelict Electronics Workshop
Dirty Electronics
David Tudor Rain Forest (realisation here)
Alvin Lucier Music for Solo Performer
Phil Archer

Resistance
-- Resistance simulation
-- Resistor chart
-- Potentiometers
-- Multimeter tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bF3OyQ3HwfU
-- Capacitance converter
-- Capacitance code calculator: http://www.electronics2000.co.uk/calc/capacitor-code-calculator.php
-- Make video about the capacitor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYH9dGl4gUE
-- Breadboard tutorial: https://startingelectronics.org/beginners/start-electronics-now/tut1-breadboard-circuits/

For next week: prepare a short demo of the VCS3/MS-20/Theremin


BRY015 Workshop Demonstration: Amplify your Toy task BRY015 Workshop Demonstration: Synth on a chip (Synthesis on a Chip) See task for details BRY015 Workshop Demonstration: Multimeter (see VLE for demo video) Follow-up Work - work on project - Read chapters 5, 7, 8 and 15 of Handmade Electronic Music - listen CD to Collins, 2006 and watch DVD to Collins, 2009 - Collins, N., (2009), Handmade Electronic Music, Parts 3 and 4; New York: Routledge
notes
Task 3
 - Amplifier

task 3 due: w13
task 3 weighting: logbook (50%)
Task 4
 - Synthesis on a chip

task 4 due: w13
task 4 weighting: logbook (50%)
task summary |  VLE
task summary |  VLE
4
040 Lecture
- VCS3/MS-20/Theremin/Arturia MiniBrute session
- Korg MS-20 tutorial
- Arturia MiniBrute 1 the Oscillator
- VCS3 user manual
- Experimenting with EMS VCS3
- Circuit Bending Projects Check-up
- History and Curation
- NIME Presentations tutorials - you need to have picked your topic!
Presentation List and Details

Other demonstrations
- Breadboards
- Different types of board (breadboard, veloboard, etc...)
- Capacitors
- Build your own amplifier


BRY015 Workshop Demonstration: Sudomini
notes
Task 5
 - Sudomini

task 5 due: w13
task 5 weighting: logbook (50%)
task summary |  VLE
5
Hel040 Lecture/Seminar
- "The Art of Loop" (broadcast to discuss)
Matthew Herbert, The Art of the Loop, BBC Radio 4, Saturday March 1st 2014, 1030, 2:40 
http://bobnational.net/record/204312/media_id/206925

- RH demonstration (gagglina)

w7 presentations 
- Check and claim presentations
- NIME presentation tutorials (please bring along your chosen paper or project).

w8 workshop

feedback sheets
criteria and outcomes


BRY015 Workshop Demonstration Make a mic Task 6 - Make a mike task 6 due: w13 task 6 weighting: logbook (50%) Other demonstrations for you to investigate - Simple Oscillator: see chapter 18, Handmade Electronic Music - Piezos as sensors and microphones (contact mic) - The joy of activating a slinky - also try using a Hugh Davies-type wire grid? - Hugh Davies 'music for bowed diaphragms' - Twitching Loudspeakers (chapter 5, Handmade Electronic Music) - Telephone coils: circuit sniffing - Sensor Technology and Sonic Art
notes
Task 6
 - Make a mike

task 6 due: w13
task 6 weighting: logbook (50%)
task summary |  VLE
6
040 Lecture

- NIME Presentations 1
- Presentation List
- Presentation Details

- Digital curation, retrieval and preservation

Plus TED talks, for instance:
- Ge Wang: The DIY orchestra of the future
- David Byrne: How architecture helped music evolve
- Scott Rickard: The beautiful math behind the ugliest music
- Daniel Wolpert: The real reason for brains
- Tod Machover + Dan Ellsey: Inventing instruments that unlock new music
- Mark Applebaum: The mad scientist of music
- Mark Ronson: How sampling transformed music
- Pamelia Kurstin: The untouchable music of the theremin
- Vincent Moon and Naná Vasconcelos: Hidden music rituals around the world

Second presentation confirmation

My Teacher is an App broadcast to discuss
My Teacher is an App 1/3
My Teacher is an App 2/3
My Teacher is an App 3/3

w7 presentations
w8 workshop
feedback sheets
criteria and outcomes

Introduction to Arduino
Different Boards
Arduino - http://www.arduino.cc/
Wiring - http://www.wiring.org.co/
mbed - https://mbed.org

Sensor Technology Materials List

If you haven't taken Circuit Bending 
(formerly Performance Technology)
You might want to go through a few things...
- Getting Started
- The Seven Basic Rules of Hacking
- How to Solder

- List of sensors (Wikipedia)

Tutorials for Circuit Bending Workshop


BRY015 Workshop Demonstrations: Capacitative Touch Sensor Boxing Other demonstrations - Confirm presentations - Switches (and LEDs) - Music Boxes, magnets and player pianos - Laser Microphone - Laser Musicbox - Find a card or Chip on Board unit - available from here, for instance. - Adding things to your toy - Tape Head (ch.9, HEM, 1st ed) - Music Box Miscellaneous - Handmade Electronic Music examples (how things are presented) - Hydrophones, pyrophones, thermistors - Take your game controller apart...
Task 7
 - Capacitative Touch Sensor

task 7 due: w13
task 7 weighting: logbook (50%)
Task 8
 - Boxing

task 8 due: w13
task 8 weighting: logbook
task summary |  VLE
to top of pagetasks123456789101112
Week Focus Project
7
040 Lecture
NIME Presentations 2
Presentation List
Presentation Details

BRY015 Workshop Demonstration
Workshop Feedback
Lynda.com Arduino video


Task 10
 - Vibrating a piezo

task 10 due: w13
task 10 weighting: logbook (50%)




Task 10
 - Vibrating a piezo

task 10 due: w13
task 10 weighting: logbook (50%)
task summary |  VLE
Easter Vacation
to top of pagetasks123456789101112
8
040 Lecture/Seminar 4
Circuit Bending Workshop


BRY015 Workshop Demonstration: 

Task 11
 - Connecting the Arduino, MaxMSP and SuperCollider

task 11 due: w13
task 11 weighting: logbook (50%)

Task 11
 - Connecting the Arduino, MaxMSP and SuperCollider

task 11 due: w13
task 11 weighting: logbook (50%)
task summary |  VLE
9
040 Lecture/Seminar
Logbook tutorials and revision



BRY015 Workshop Demonstration
Task 12
 - Mapping

task 12 due: w13
task 12 weighting: logbook (50%)

Tutorials/Practical


Task 12
 - Mapping

task 12 due: w13
task 12 weighting: logbook (50%)
task summary |  VLE
10

040 Lecture/Seminar
Logbook tutorials

BRY015 Workshop Demonstration
Tutorials/Practical

 
11
040 Lecture/Seminar
Arduino Workshop 1

BRY015 Workshop Demonstration
Tutorials/Practical
 
12
040 Lecture/Seminar
Arduino Workshop 2

BRY015 Workshop Demonstration
NB May 2015 bank holiday
 

 
 

to top of page  Assessment Criteria

Your work will be marked according to the criteria set out in the document artefact creation, also with elements of oral presentation and written work (the logbook).


 
 

 

to top of page  Reading and Listening

Included on MDF:

  • Collins, N., (2009) Handmade Electronic Music, New York: Routledge
  • Dale, D., ed. (2005-6) Make: Technology on Your Time, Volumes 1-12, California: O'Reilly Media Inc.
  • Ghazala, R.,(2005) Circuit Bending, Indianapolis: Wiley Publishing
  • Heathfield, A., ed. (2005) Live: Art and Performance, London: Tate Publishing

Also recommended:

  • Emmerson, S. (2000) Music, Electronic Media and Culture, Kent : Ashgate
  • O'Sullivan, D. & T. Igoe, eds. (2004) Physical Computing: Sensing and Controlling the Physical World with Computers, London: Premier Press
  • Amdahl, K., (1991) There are no electrons, Arvada, Colorado: Clearwater Publishing Company

 
 

to top of page  Interesting Things



cambridge listings and venues
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london listings
cafe oto    national film theatre    south bank    national theatre    tate    theatre guide    whatsonstage.com    young vic    kinetica

Organisations

Media

Festivals

Conferences

Competitions


 
 

to top of page  Feedback

You are entitled to written feedback on your performance for all your assessed 
work. For all assessment tasks which are not examinations, this is provided by a 
member of academic staff completing the assignment coversheet on which your mark 
and feedback will relate to the achievement of the module's intended learning 
outcomes and the assessment criteria you were given for the task when it was 
first issued.

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students. However, you are entitled to feedback on your performance in an 
examination and may request a meeting with the Module Leader or Tutor to see 
your examination script and to discuss your performance.

Anglia Ruskin is committed to providing you with feedback on all assessed work 
within 20 working days of the submission deadline or the date of an examination. 
This is extended to 30 days for feedback for a Major Project module (please note 
that working days excludes those days when Anglia Ruskin University is 
officially closed; e.g.: between Christmas and New Year). Personal tutors will 
offer to read feedback from several modules and help you to address any common 
themes that may be emerging.

At the main Anglia Ruskin University campuses, each Faculty will publish details 
of the arrangement for the return of your assessed work (e.g.: a marked essay or 
case study etc.). Any work that is not collected by you from the Faculty within 
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To assure ourselves that our marking processes are comparable with other 
universities in the UK, Anglia Ruskin provides samples of student assessed work 
to external examiners as a routine part of our marking processes. External 
examiners are experienced academic staff from other universities who scrutinise 
your work and provide Anglia Ruskin academic staff with feedback and advice. 
Many of Anglia Ruskin's staff act as external examiners at other universities.

On occasion, you will receive feedback and marks for pieces of work that you 
completed in the earlier stages of the module. We provide you with this feedback 
as part of the learning experience and to help you prepare for other assessment 
tasks that you have still to complete. It is important to note that, in these 
cases, the marks for these pieces of work are unconfirmed as the processes 
described above for the use of external examiners will not have been completed. 
This means that, potentially, marks can change, in either direction!

Marks for modules and individual pieces of work become confirmed on the Dates 
for the Official Publication of Results, which can be checked at http://www.anglia.ac.uk/results.

 
 
 

to top of page  Assessment Offences

You are reminded that any work that you submit must be your own. All suspected 
assessment offences will be investigated and can result in severe penalties.  
Please note that it is your responsibility to consult the relevant sections of 
the Academic Regulations (section 10 - see www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs) and 
the Student Handbook.

When you are preparing your work for submission, it is important that you 
understand the various academic conventions that you are expected to follow in 
order to make sure that you do not leave yourself open to accusations of 
plagiarism (e.g.: the correct use of referencing, citations, footnotes etc.) and 
that your work maintains its academic integrity.

Plagiarism is theft and constitutes the presentation of another's work as your 
own in order to gain an unfair advantage. You will receive advice and guidance 
on how to avoid plagiarism and other elements of poor academic practice during 
the early stages of your studies at Anglia Ruskin.

Guidance on being honest in your work
Introduction
Being honest in your work is at the heart of studying and working at university. 
To be honest in your work you must acknowledge the ideas and work of others you 
use, and you must not try to get an advantage over others by being dishonest. It 
is important that you understand what it means to be honest in your work. 
Although there is general agreement within the UK academic community about the 
types of activity that are unacceptable, this does vary slightly between 
institutions, and may be different from where you studied before.

We have developed this guidance to help you understand what it means to be 
honest in your work, and what you should do to make sure that you are handing in 
work that meets our expectations. This means we can make sure that we can 
maintain reliable standards for our academic awards, and students continue to 
enjoy studying for academic qualifications that have a good reputation. In this 
guidance we will:

-	clearly define what being honest in your work and good practice mean, and 
how you can achieve this; 
-	define 'assessment offences', including plagiarism, cheating and collusion; 
-	identify the resources, help and advice available to help you learn the 
academic skills you need to avoid committing assessment offences; 
-	explain how we expect you to behave; and 
-	describe what happens if we think you have committed an assessment offence. 

Being honest in your work and good practice
You can show good practice when you do your work independently, honestly and in 
a proper academic style, using good referencing and acknowledging all of your 
sources.  

To show good academic practice you must: 

-	show you understand the literature; 
-	use research from academics and others in your area of study; 
-	discuss and evaluate ideas and theories; 
-	develop your own independent evaluation of academic issues; and
-	develop your own arguments. 

To support your own good practice you will need to develop your:
 
-	skills at studying and getting information (for example, reading, taking 
notes, research and so on); 
-	skills in looking at an argument and making your own evaluation (for 
example, having a balanced opinion, using reasoning and argument); 
-	writing skills for essays, reports, dissertations and so on; 
-	referencing skills (how you include your sources of information in your 
work); and
-	exam techniques (for example, revising and timing).

Achieving good practice is not as complicated as it may appear. You need to do 
the following.

-	Know the rules. 
-	Make sure you reference all of your information sources. Poor practice or 
dishonesty in your work (such as plagiarism, cheating, fraud and so on) can be a 
result of you not knowing what you are allowed to do. 
-	Develop your own style. Sometimes students include too much original text 
from the work of others, as they believe that they cannot 'put it any better'. 
Although you should try to express ideas in your own words, quoting or summing 
up ideas from academic sources is fine, as long as you say where you have taken 
this from. You must also reference other people's performances or art in your 
own work. It fine to use other people's performances and art, but you must be 
completely clear about why you are using that work, and make sure it is obvious 
that it isn't your own.

Definitions of assessment offences
Plagiarism is when you present someone else's work, words, images, ideas, 
opinions or discoveries, whether published or not, as your own. It is also when 
you take the artwork, images or computer-generated work of others, without 
properly acknowledging where this is from or you do this without their 
permission. 

You can commit plagiarism in examinations, but is most likely to happen in 
coursework, assignments, portfolios, essays, dissertations and so on. 

Examples of plagiarism include: 

-	directly copying from written work, physical work, performances, recorded 
work or images, without saying where this is from; 
-	using information from the internet or electronic media (such as DVDs and 
CDs) which belongs to someone else, and presenting it as your own; 
-	rewording someone else's work, without referencing them; and
-	handing in something for assessment which has been produced by another 
student or person.

It is important that you do not plagiarise - intentionally or unintentionally - 
because the work of others and their ideas are their own. There are benefits to 
producing original ideas in terms of awards, prizes, qualifications, reputation 
and so on. To use someone else's work, words, images, ideas or discoveries is a 
form of theft.

Collusion is similar to plagiarism as it is an attempt to present another's work 
as your own. In plagiarism the original owner of the work is not aware you are 
using it, in collusion two or more people may be involved in trying to produce 
one piece of work to benefit one individual, or plagiarising another person's 
work.

Examples of collusion include:

-	agreeing with others to cheat; 
-	getting someone else to produce part or all of your work; 
-	copying the work of another person (with their permission); 
-	submitting work from essay banks; 
-	paying someone to produce work for you; and
-	allowing another student to copy your own work.

Many parts of university life need students to work together. Working as a team, 
as directed by your tutor, and producing group work is not collusion. Collusion 
only happens if you produce joint work to benefit of one or more person and try 
to deceive another (for example the assessor).

Cheating is when someone aims to get unfair advantage over others.

Examples of cheating include:

-	taking unauthorised material into the examination room; 
-	inventing results (including experiments, research, interviews and 
observations);
-	handing your own previously graded work back in; 
-	getting an examination paper before it is released;
-	behaving in a way that means other students perform poorly;
-	pretending to be another student; and
-	trying to bribe members of staff or examiners.

Help to avoid assessment offences
Most of our students are honest and want to avoid making assessment offences. We 
have a variety of resources, advice and guidance available to help make sure you 
can develop good academic skills. We will make sure that we make available 
consistent statements about what we expect in this document, and in student 
handbooks and module guides. You will be able to do tutorials on being honest in 
your work from the library and other central support services and faculties, and 
you will be able to test your written work for plagiarism using 'TurnitinšUK' (a 
software package that detects plagiarism).

You can get advice on how to honestly use the work of others in your own work 
from the library website (www.libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/referencing.htm) 
and your lecturer and personal tutor.

You will have an opportunity to do a 'formative' assignment before you finish 
and hand in your first 'summative' assignment. A 'formative' assignment is one 
in which you can talk about your work thoroughly with your tutor to make sure 
that you are working at the correct level for your award, and that you 
understand what is meant by good practice (a 'summative' assignment counts 
towards the assessment for your course).

You will be able to use 'TurnitinšUK', a special software package which is used 
to detect plagiarism. TurnitinšUK will produce a report which clearly shows if 
passages in your work have been taken from somewhere else. You may talk about 
this with your personal tutor to see where you may need to improve your academic 
practice. We will not see these formative TurnitinšUK reports as assessment 
offences.

If you are not sure whether the way you are working meets our requirements, you 
should talk to your personal tutor. They will be able to help you and tell you 
about other resources that will help you develop your academic skills.

What we expect from you
We will make sure you have the chance to practice your academic skills and avoid 
accidentally breaking our Academic Regulations. On page nine of the Student 
Charter (see http://web.anglia.ac.uk/anet/students/pdfs/09_student_charter.pdf), 
it says you have to 'be aware of the academic rules relating to your studies'.

To make sure that you are aware of the rules, we expect you to agree to:

-	read this guidance and make sure you thoroughly understand it;
-	work through 'PILOT', the online tutorial available on our library website 
(http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/pilot/), which aims to help you learn good practice 
and has a useful section on plagiarism;
-	make sure that you are familiar with how to reference (acknowledge other 
people's work); 
-	correctly reference all the sources for the information you have included in 
your work; 
-	identify information you have downloaded from the internet; 
-	never use someone else's ideas for a performance, film or TV programme, 
their artwork, graphics (including graphs, spreadsheets and so on and 
information from the internet) as if they are yours; 
-	only hand in your own original work; 
-	never use another person's work as if it were your own; and 
-	never let other students use or copy your work.

What we will do for you
To help you avoid making assessment offences, our staff will:

-	make sure they are familiar with the guidance on being honest in your work 
and the Academic Regulations;
-	tell you clearly about the guidance on being honest in your work and any 
guidelines on misconduct, and record the dates for future reference; 
-	arrange library information sessions for you; 
-	promote the resources on the library website and put links to them in module 
guides and student handbooks;
-	include statements on academic honesty in each module guide, making sure 
they are consistent throughout our university;
-	make you aware of the punishments for misconduct early in the course; 
-	give you effective guidance on how you should acknowledge the information 
you have used; 
-	tell you, in writing if possible, how far you may work with other students 
in your coursework; 
-	plan procedures for assessing work in a way that reduces plagiarism, 
cheating and collusion; 
-	be aware that you may have worked differently in the past and make sure that 
you are aware of good practice in the UK;
-	familiarise themselves with 'TurnitinšUK' and its reports; and
-	report all suspected misconduct using the proper disciplinary procedures.

Procedures for assessment offences
An assessment offence is the general term used to define cases where a student 
has tried to get unfair academic advantage in an assessment for themselves or 
another student.

We will aim to give you as much help as possible to avoid an assessment offence. 
We listed a number of possible assessment offences earlier in the document. 
These, and any relevant breaks of the Academic Regulations are dishonest, 
unacceptable and not allowed. We will fully investigate all cases of suspected 
assessment offences. If we prove that you have committed an assessment offence, 
we will take action against you using our disciplinary procedures.

For full details of what punishments you may receive for assessment offences, 
see the Academic Regulations, section 10 at: www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs

And finally
One of the main aims of university is to give you the ability to learn, have 
independent judgment, academic rigour and intellectual honesty.

You should encourage people to ask questions, to show personal and professional 
honesty, and have mutual respect.

You, university teachers and support staff are responsible for working together 
to achieve this aim.

References
Adapted from Scott, M, (2000), Academic Misconduct Policy. A model for the FE 
Sector. (© Association of Colleges, 2000)

More information
-	Academic Regulations, section 10 (www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs)
-	PILOT, the online tutorial in academic practice 
(www.libweb.anglia.ac.uk/pilot/)
-	Referencing procedures 
(http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/referencing.htm)
-	RefWorks, a bibliographic management service that allows you to create a 
personal database and collect bibliographies in a variety of styles
(www.libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/refworks.htm)
-	The Student Charter
(http://web.anglia.ac.uk/anet/students/pdfs/09_student_charter.pdf)


 
 
 

to top of page  Attendance Requirements

Attending all your classes is very important and one of the best ways to help 
you succeed in this module. In accordance with the Student Charter, you are 
expected to arrive on time and take an active part in all your timetabled 
classes. If you are unable to attend a class for a valid reason (e.g.: illness), 
please contact your Module Tutor.

Anglia Ruskin will closely monitor the attendance of all students and will 
contact you by e-mail if you have been absent without notice for two weeks. 
Continued absence can result in the termination of your registration as you will 
be considered to have withdrawn from your studies.

Practical projects, rehearsals and ensemble performances are collaborative in 
their nature and require full attendance. Students taking practical and 
performance modules should be aware that at certain times a more intensive 
commitment is required which must be balanced against other life and work 
commitments. You will be notified of these extra rehearsals as far in advance as 
possible.

Please see the notes on 'Attendance' in the Anglia Ruskin Undergraduate Student 
Handbook for full University regulations.

To be effectively prepared for a teaching session, you should:

-	have completed all the set reading or other prescribed work as described in 
the course handbook or as set by your lecturer
-	have your own copy of the required text or other material
-	bring adequate writing materials for taking notes
-	be wearing appropriate clothing, especially for rehearsals and performance 
workshops
-	arrive mentally and physically prepared for the session

International students who are non-EEA nationals and in possession of entry
clearance/leave to remain as a student (student visa) are required to be
in regular attendance at Anglia Ruskin. Failure to do so is considered to
be a breach of national immigration regulations. Anglia Ruskin, like all British 
Universities, is statutorily obliged to inform the Border and Immigration Agency 
of the Home Office of significant unauthorised absences by any student visa 
holders.

 
 
 

to top of page  Attendance for Group and Collaborative Work

For modules that include collaborative practical work, especially those leading 
to live performance events, there is an especial necessity for full and punctual 
attendance. Poor attendance and/or engagement inevitably has a detrimental 
affect on the work of your fellow students and will hinder their achievement, as 
well as your own.

If you are unable to attend a particular rehearsal, class or workshop you should 
inform your Module Leader or the Department Administrator immediately, and in 
advance of the class wherever possible. All members of staff have voicemail and 
email. You will then be entered on the register as an 'explained absence'. 
Failure to do this will mean that you will be marked 'unexplained absent'.
 
Absence for reasons of external work commitments, timetable clashes or time 
mismanagement will not be accepted. 

You should be aware that poor attendance and/or lack of commitment will 
inevitably affect your ability to meet the module learning outcomes to a 
satisfactory standard, and consequently your mark may be affected.