rhoadley.net   music   research   courses   software   blogs

cv    music    text    software    seminars


vimeo   youtube   gallery
through the sharp hawthorn   only connect   in principio   miscellaneous   concertino   three pieces for two pianos   four archetypes   petrochemicals   copenhagen   ambience   hello  
histrionica   telephony   many worlds   127 haiku   128 haiku   triggered   touching sound   127 messages   calder's violin   fluxus   fluxus tree   player piano   three streams   quantum canticorum   december variations   semaphore   piano glyphs   how to play the piano   choreograms   edge violations   homage

devices:   gaggle   gagglina   wired   threads   glyphs   metapiano   digiphone

NB All material on this site is © Richard Hoadley (and others), 1990-2017


One Hundred and Twenty-Seven Haiku

Automatic music for computer
May, 2009


About the piece

Constructed using SuperCollider, One Hundred and Twenty-seven Haiku is a development of pSY and its products The Copenhagen Interpretation (1998-1999) and Ambience (2002) and the more recent Many Worlds (2008). The former used custom made software made with Visual Basic to control Yamaha SY synthesisers. The latter used SuperCollider to control similar TG77 synths. One Hundred and Twenty-Seven Haiku uses SuperCollider to do everything: design and generate the sounds as well as decide when to play them and what they should play.


128 Haiku Photo courtesy of Tim Regan

Performances and Publications

Performances
(2008) Many Worlds
Semi-automatic music for Yamaha TG synthesiser and computers
Kettles Yard, Cambridge, 11th May
info: http://rhoadley.net/comp/manyworlds.php
audio: http://rhoadley.org/sounds/manyworlds/ManyWorlds05n.mp3

(2009) One Hundred and Twenty-Seven Haiku
Automatic performance/composition with custom software
Kettles Yard, Cambridge, 10th May
info: http://rhoadley.net/comp/haiku/index.php
audio: http://rhoadley.net/sounds/127/127Haiku_128k_090507_101239.mp3

(2010) One Hundred and Twenty-Eight Haiku
Automatic performance/composition with custom hardware and software.  
Kettles Yard, Cambridge, 9th May
info: http://rhoadley.net/comp/128haiku/index.php
audio: http://rhoadley.net/sounds/128/128HaikuLive.m4a

(2011) One Hundred and Twenty-Seven Messages
Crowdsourced composition and performance controlled by mobile devices.
Presented at 'Sounds Like Mobility' Conference, Cambridge, 17th May
Commissioned through 'Enterprising Academics' scholarship
http://rhoadley.net/comp/messages/index.php

Publications
(2011) A principled approach to developing new languages for live coding
Samuel Aaron, Alan F. Blackwell, Richard Hoadley and Tim Regan, 
Proceedings of NIME (New Interfaces for Musical Expression), Oslo
(ISBN: 978-82-991841-7-5)
http://www.nime2011.org/proceedings/papers/K04-Aaron.pdf

Papers
(2011) Analysis of algorithmic music generated through physical embodiment
Seventh International Conference on Music Since 1900/International Conference of the Society for Music Analysis, University of Lancaster, July
http://rhoadley.net/research/abstracts/analysis_algorithms_richard_hoadley.pdf

(2010) Towards embodied control of algorithmic music
Music and Numbers, Canterbury Christ Church University, 14 - 15 May
(Abstract published in ISBN 978-1-899253-76-0)


One Hundred and Twenty-seven Haiku by rhoadley

Refresh the page
for a new haiku

Haiku Generator

The Generator was originally designed and copyrighted by AHA! Software Inc., Victoria, BC, Canada and can be found here.

One plan is to display the haikus while the piece is being performed, ad libitum. It's possible that I'll try to find a way for the haikus to actually influence the performance of the piece.


 
 
 
 
 
 

Warning: file(/data01/rhoadley/public_html/php/footer.txt): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /data02/rhoadley/public_html/comp/haiku/index.php on line 170